How a Jiwaka woman started a journey of community transformation before her death


A community champion leaves an example life for all as she bids farewell. An inspiring and heart-breaking story from Serahphina Aupong on Scott Waide’s blog.

When someone sets out to make a difference in a society, most times one would think of all the pre-conditions that need to be in place before that person can begin to effect that change.

Some would like the change maker to be of a certain gender, come from a certain place, have a certain level of education, wealth and age. Then there are some people who by simply being who they are and doing what they believe is right, change a society.

Maria Koimb was one such person.
From Domil in Jiwaka Province, Maria was the only sister to five brothers. Right after completing her grade 10 education, she was abandoned by her boyfriend with a newborn child. For a sixteen-year-old girl in 1992, in a rural village in Papua New Guinea, Maria’s life could have gone a lot of different directions.
What she chose to do set the…

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The Capital


A beautiful insight with great images by blogger Marcelle Bucher from her recent trip with family to Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea.

Marcelle Bucher

Although brief, a few days in Moresby was a breath of fresh (debatable) air after a long three years of not visiting. Touchdown on the tarmac was followed by a lengthy but interesting tour of the miles and miles of new roads built around the city as well as a visit to Koki Fish Market. The multitude, quality and price of Koki is unbelievable. The market is built over the water so the fish is literally straight from the sea to the stalls.

In fact, the whole marketing scene in PNG is unreal. The produce is fresh, the price makes eating your vegetables or fruit incredibly feasible and attractive, and frankly… the people selling the produce are inspiring.

Labour is on a whole other level for market sellers despite the foolish appearance the job gives of sitting around all day. I thought the bag full of produce I was carrying…

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Unusually Sweet


Hi friends,

I have been away from this blog for a little while, working on other projects and deciding the future of the blog. I would like to continue the blog, but re-arrange or improve it in some way so if you have any suggestions, feel free to add to the discussion.  In the meantime, here are two stories I found on YouTube while researching strawberries to grow this winter.

I am trying to re-plant my garden which has now completely overgrown from heavy rains earlier this quarter. I hope you enjoy the videos.

And for more usual sweetness see what else our world is inventing. It sounds and looks weird, but I’d love  to try these ‘new’ fruits. Tell me in comments below if you have tried any of these fruits. I would like to know.

 

Call for Submissions: Poems for Peace: Anthology


Thank you my friend Robert from O at the Edges blog for sharing this with us. Please submit your poems for peace to the link below the article.

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O at the Edges

Some of you might be interested in submitting poems to this anthology. I know I am.

August 1, 2018 deadline!

poems for peace: an anthology to uplift encourage & inspire

This anthology, poems for peace (forthcoming, fall 2018), is the love-child of a group of poets and listeners who have been gathering quarterly in San Antonio, Texas since Nov. 11, 2017 in association with the San Antonio peaceCENTER.  This anthology will be published as a peaceCENTERbook, with all proceeds going to support the CENTER.

While we are aware that many horrors occur in our world and that, as a people, we seem to be in turmoil and conflict on many fronts, our aim is to provide respite from the apparent problems and to purposefully turn our attention to the good, the Whole, the Holy, that which is full of peace and comfort.

For this inaugural issue of poems for…

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Papua New Guinea’s Most Colourful Singer Moses Tau Has Died


Post Courier News

Moses Tau made a place for the gay community in Papua New Guinea by forcing this place through his music and performances that gained Papua New Guinea and international recognition.
One of PNGs most celebrated singer Moses Tau had left us for good. Moses Tau, the country’s iconic singer had suddenly passed away an hour after he collapsed at the Lamana Hotel. His sudden death shook the country as people try to grasp the fact that he is no longer with us.As news of his passing spread, thousands of condolence messages flood the social media from both national and international users.Among the various condolences from relatives, friends and fans was a message from the Moresby South MP Justin Tkatchenko who posted his condolence message on his Hon. Justin Tkatchenko MP Facebook Page.“I have lost a wonderful friend who supported me without fear or favor and was so loved and admired by our people. He put fun and joy into our lives,” posted Tkatchenko.Mr Tkatchenko described the famous singer as vibrant and a true showman and thanked the Late star for making live more fun and exciting.He added that the late star music will still live on.

We are going to miss you. Rest in ever lasting peace my dear friend your Music lives in us forever.”

Meanwhile, the details of his death are yet to be released.

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I took this photo of Moses when he and a group of friends and I enjoyed a night out at Naked Fish last November in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea.

From simple beginnings, this very colourful and dangerously outrageous talent started a music career. Little did Papua New Guineans truly understand what Moses was up. Many ridiculed and laughed at Moses’s rhythmic hip pulsating dance movements and high pitch feminine voice which quickly became a recognised and loved music (and name) not only in PNG, but across the Pacific islands. When Moses stepped on stage, a new era was born in a country closed to gay rights, dominated by men and the ruled by the cultural Melanesian ‘big man’ mentality.

Moses Tau—‘A very brave man’60

By Ryan Goodman, 2001

There are exceptions to this seemingly endless process of discrimination and abuse. By the late 1990s, gays were well and truly stigmatised in PNG. That was when a gay Motuan gospel singer from Central Province a little to the east of Port Moresby was wooed away from his village gospel group by the PNG recording giant CHM Supersound Studios, who urged him to go solo. He adopted a generic Pacific style of singing, using falsetto voice, and so his first song Aito Paka Paka was born. It was an instant hit, and was soon followed by others.61 The accompanying video clips were all designed by Moses himself: the island-girl dancing style and costumes, lavishly replete with flowers, brightly coloured sarongs, outrageous hats and of course, the Pacific-signature swaying grass-skirt. He even managed to work a selection of tropical fruit into the dance scenes—the symbolism is obvious. It was the first public display of cross-dressing and transgenderism in the country—and it worked wonderfully. Moses became a star.62

Nevertheless, it wasn’t all easy.

When [the Aito Paka Paka clip] came out, it sort of brought this whole thing to the public, and those who were known as geligelis were harassed, they were called names … it came out to expose the lifestyle, and at the same time, had a negative side of it … it was sort of an awareness thing when Moses came out … he overdid that [the sarong and the flowers] … when Moses came out with his video clip, that was an issue among also the people here, and poor guy, I heard that he had a bad time too … people started stoning his car whenever they saw him, they were calling him names … very brave (Len).

He’s a very brave man (Adam).

stewart_figure5_4.jpg

Figure 5.4. Aito Paka Paka, flowers, brightly coloured sarongs, outrageous hats … and fruit.

Source: Image taken from the video, Moses Tau, 2005, ‘Aito Paka Paka,’ in The Best of Moses Tau.

But Moses was more than just a new pop singer sensation. He was a gay on a mission.

It is a very difficult thing in PNG to show your sexuality … is very scary, because it is not an accepted thing in PNG. I just want to do what I have and who I am. I also did it not for myself but for the suffering of we people through many years ago. And I told my friends: look, I’ll try it out, if I fail I fail. If I go through it with success, we will all benefit. So I’m targeting to educate the people of this nation to really know that there’s gays living in Papua New Guinea. So I did it. I went through it. It was very painful (Moses Tau).

Moses was invited to Cairns shortly after, for Independence celebrations.63 Then early in 2001, he was invited by the PNG community in Sydney to take part in the famous annual Mardi Gras parade. The PNG community there was constructing a float in the form of a lagatoi [seafaring canoe], to feature Moses as the ‘Pacific Queen,’ dressed as a traditional ‘Hiri Queen.’ Sponsorship was offered by PNG’s commercial radio station NauFM, ‘because he has not only developed into a prominent musician but has developed a good character. He has also developed a good following and has really lifted the image of PNG music.’64

However, this decision was not an instant hit with many. The Hiri Hahenamo [celebration of Hiri culture] refers to an annual Port Moresby festival which celebrates the Papuan tradition of the Hiri trading expeditions from the Central Province north-west to the Gulf Province, returning again as the winds change towards the end of the year. Special lagatois are built and a feature of the festival today is the Hiri Queen competition, open to girls from all surrounding Motuan villages who dress, dance and sing in a traditional manner. The Motu-Koitabu Council, which represents the Motu and Koitabu villages surrounding Port Moresby, took offence, its Chairman saying,

We [Motu Koitabuans] … do not approve nor do we encourage homosexuality in our society—traditional or contemporary … [we] are disgusted and not happy at all—to say the least—to have a very important and serious aspect of the culture portrayed at a festival for homosexuals.65

We are totally against the Hiri Hanenamo [sic] concept, which promotes morals and good behaviour, being taken and abused at such a morally wrong festival … we do not approve of or encourage such practices, and if Moses Tau wants to represent his personal beliefs and ideals, we suggest he represent himself personally by tailoring his own outfit on a theme which does not threaten to bring our name and culture into disrepute.66

This statement was followed by letters to the Editor and an FM-Central government radio talk-back show in which callers were divided.67 Many Motu-Koitabuans protested the desecration of their culture but others supported Moses, praising his talent, his openness and his right to perform as he wished.68

Moses was very troubled. He claims a deep respect for traditions and culture, and points to his background in the church and his family’s tradition as gospel singers.69 He immediately called a press conference and denied the reports of the lagatoi float and the Hiri Queen costume. He said his Mardi Gras appearance was to promote his album and not to represent the PNG gay community.70 The matter was kept in public view by a further news item showing Moses receiving his visa from the Australian Deputy High Commissioner, and relating how Sydney radio stations were carrying reports of the difficulties he was facing and the concern of the Mardi Gras organisers.71 But in the end, Moses did not ride on a lagatoi float or wear traditional Hiri Queen costume—instead, he wore yet another of his ‘Pacific’ creations, and danced his way along the street.72

After Moses returned from Sydney, his success and position were assured, with club appearances,73 sky-rocketing music sales and even a brief squabble between recording studios over him.74 Club performances of ‘Mardi Gras’ nights were staged, and were so successful that when another was proposed, Moses called on his gay friends to do a ‘queen’ show. To his surprise, many Filipinos also took part. These shows became a great success, attracting cosmopolitan audiences and many other clubs followed suit, and became the foundation for the drag shows of today.

But it was about more than fun. Moses took the opportunity to promote awareness after every show, saying,

We have these kind of people, this kind of community of people, that live in this country. We have no choice, we can’t change them, but let’s give them a chance to show their package, what they have. Give them a freedom for what they can do, for them to enjoy life. We can’t keep them in a cage for them to live in fear all the time (Moses Tau).

He continues his community outreach work, travelling around villages at his own expense, distributing condoms and promoting awareness about gay rights, HIV, the dangers of consuming homebrew alcohol and marijuana. Although he receives no funding support for this work, he has achieved a strong measure of fame throughout the country, and in January 2006 was invited to sing at the funeral of Bill Skate, the first PNG Prime Minister to die in office.

Opinion is divided as to whether the recent trend towards coming out was due to Moses or not.

One of the break-throughs I think especially in Moresby was Moses Tau’s [Aito Paka Paka] clip. That made people talk about it. That’s the turning point, it’s like an awareness that there are these sort of people around (Barry and Colin).

Before ‘she’ [Moses Tau] brought out the clip [Aito Paka Paka], we came out to the public before, the younger ones. As far as from what I see, those bigger ones, we’ve got plenty but because of the culture and the traditions … people are still hiding and some are forced to get married, and some, they just keep themselves locked up … like the group now we have here, like as for myself, at first I didn’t come out … but through those ones, I can see that … it’s not Moses Tau, it’s these ones … they’re the ones like, coming out, all this stuff (Palopa, indicating others in the meeting).

Even if Moses was the catalyst, the gains have been small and there is still a long way to go, even for committed activists, as Victor’s Tale above demonstrates.

 

Chinese Red String – Love Poem J.K.Leahy


Chinese Red String – Poem J K Leahy

Image: Impremedia.com

 

A knot in a soft Chinese red string

The red string of fate cries too late

Too weak and futile to unravel

A  mystery of discord heightens

As I hold on, you slowly unbind

Rapidly, becoming sand in my hand

Grains isolate and quickly fall,

allowing the world, a key to pry

 

An unspoken goodbye at dawn

Hugged a ghost, a pale wounded doe

Unease hung in air,

like unattached wallpaper

Muttering words “see you later’

Decapitated and torn in fray

Fog engulfed an anticipated day

The doe cuffed in disarray of sheets

Trapped in the tides of a hurt heartbeat

(This is only a part of a longer poem – but I hope you enjoyed these verses).

Himalayan Morchella


Very cool discoveries in nature by Baadaal Hillboy Explores. Some of you know I love mushrooms.

baadal_hillboy_explores

Known as thunthu in our local language, Morchella is a species of fungus which grow during the start of the spring season in some high altitude areas.

Morchella has a honeycomb like structure and they can grow up to 15cm in length. They grow in the moist environment and most probably after the rains. One can find them under the hedges, rotten leaves and in grass.

Morchella has a high medicinal value and hence have a high demand in the market. Collecting them serve as a source of income to some poor families in the villages. But things doesn’t always go right. Last year a young girl had an encounter with the bear in the wild while she was collecting thunthu and she lost her life.

Morchella are edible too and they taste like mushrooms but it is not easy to find so many of them for a good dinner.

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Montreal Insectarium


Inspired by the insect world – Citizen Sketcher.

Citizen Sketcher

We need only look at nature to be inspired by its infinite variety.

I love to paint creatures, big or small.

You have to know, you can’t really beat the universe at its own game. Just look at this!

Still, it’s fun to try 🙂 And you learn something from every attempt.

These sketches are making me say this – I think you don’t need an art school or a teacher. You just need to get out and experience what life has to show you. Look at how far I’ve come in eight years since sketching the Insectarium.

The doing is more important than the having done, and the journey is the goal itself.

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How conservation is embedded in the Kampalap culture of Siassi | By Brendon Zebedee


I love to read stories about our people (in Papua New Guinea) continuing to preserve their culture. I am especially proud because the Siassi is in my province and I have family there. Thank you Brendon Zebedee and Scott Waide for bringing us this cultural heritage story.

siassiPic: Siassi Island Cruz

For  the Kampalap people of Siassi, Morobe province,  hunting is one of the survival skills that is passed on from generation to generation in which they used it to search for wild meat to feed their families and relatives.

There is a traditional hunting season called Titava.  Titava in the  Kaimanga language of Kampalap people which means searching for wild pigs with a traditional net made of a special tree called kaivus barks.

The hunting seasons begins when the local people in the village want to celebrate a traditional feast called mailang. It is usually celebrated in the Christmas period where children especially boys ranging from 3 years old to 14 years old will be circumcised which signifies that this boy is from the Kampalap society.

When the time comes for their traditional occasions, especially in the Christmas period, all the elderly men and young boys…

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Tribalmystic is storytelling about people, places, and things that have extraordinary stories. Author: Joycelin Leahy

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