Tribalmystic – About Joycelin Leahy


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My name is Joycelin Kauc Leahy and I live in Brisbane, Australia. I am from Papua New Guinea. I created the name Tribalmystic about 20 years ago because I think I am tribal and mystic in many ways.

I have many interests.  I write about the Art, Culture and Heritage of Melanesian and Papua New Guinea people, because I am one and I am passionate about my heritage. I also write about interesting people, places and objects that have extraordinary stories. Some of my posts are about international issues I believe in, such as, how we can protect the earth and contribute to a better place for our future generations. Climate Change issues should be all our concerns – not just the politicians. I believe we should make time to also protect all life-forms and their habitats. Imagine life without plants, trees and all the creatures, we don’t want that.

Women have the right to an equal place and participation in anywhere in the world. End violence against women now.

My own story

I am part of a tribe. I was raised by my mother and grandmother. Like many indigenous people that continue to struggle to hold on to their heritage, I feel that it is my responsibility to work hard to protect, preserve and sustain what belongs to my people. The blog is one way of promoting and protecting my heritage. I urge all Melanesians to protect their culture.

I come from a small village called Wagang, outside Lae, Morobe Province. I am an Ahe woman. My biological father is Australian, whom I met when was 19-years-old. That’s another story.

I studied Journalism (University of Papua New Guinea) and also completed a Masters in Museum Studies  (University of Queensland).  While this kind of education is important for the world we live in, I have learnt more by following my mother, grandmother, uncles and aunties when I was growing up. We learnt from our elders. The connection we have with land, animals, spirits and our ancestors remains a powerful force within me. For example, if I hear certain birds cry, I know the messages they are sending me. My friends often joke that I am psychic as what we know in the western world, but really, the magic is in observing, being in and feeling one with nature.

For tribal and indigenous people around the world I would like to say – please fight to protect your heritage. Once it’s gone, it’s lost. Your languages for instance. Speak it and teach your children. Make time to practice.

Thank you for reading my blog. Please leave a comment or if you would like to contact me, here is my email address: joycelinleahy@gmail.com

Bikpla tenkyu!

 

 

 

156 thoughts on “Tribalmystic – About Joycelin Leahy”

  1. Awsome stuff you have going on in your content. Not alot of Papua New Guineans realise how vulnerable our culture and traditional lifestyles are from introduced global trend and outside influences. keeping that wa of life is a hefty task but a simple blog is a superb way to start, cheers all the way 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Barnsley Vesikula Ban. I’m a University student studying architecture at PNG University of Technology. I’m using a pen name for the blog lol. ol writing blo yu i intresting turu. wanbel em stap 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Halo Barnsley, wanbel wankain istap. Architect em gutpla samting. Naise. Mi bai putim sampla links long blog b’long mi bihain. Nau mi stretim WP admin b’long mi. Happy to share your link here na vice versa – so we can share traffic. Visit Keith Jackson and Friends, see other PNG writers there too.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Tenk yu turu Joycelin. As you may have noticed, I’m a bit of an armature blogger and it’d be great to learn from fellow wantok bloggers like you. I am more than willing to share your link with my network. I cant wait to connect with everyone else and get started. .

        Liked by 1 person

      4. I taught myself here – so you can too. Trial and error is a good thing. 🙂 I visited your blog. I am happy to help. I thought if you wanted, you could share some of my posts on music. I love music. I have written a little about PNG music, but if I see anything else in your subject, bai mi tok save. Feel free to re-blog anything you like here. Try to write regularly and post something relating to your subject. That would bring traffic. Do you have an email address? I can send you some links to learn (how to blog+write content etc).

        Liked by 1 person

      5. oh awsome! tenk yu stret. i would love to have a seasoned blogger help me out. I will go thru your blog and re-blog your music-centred posts. it’s good to have some one write about PNG music. I’m very much into RnB/hiphop music and i am so proud to be at the centre of its evolution here in PNG. I produce and write music in my free time. Your articles will help me see PNG music from different perspectives. thanks for the advice and tips. here’s my email; Barnsley.tnv.ban@outlook.com..
        I’ll standby for the links. thanks 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      6. thanks alot Joycelin. I have been off for a while, lotsa work to catch up on. anyway, yes i am going through your blog to fetch articles for re-blogging. much thanks 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      7. Hi Barnsley, I am starting a new blog which will mostly be for assisting new bloggers and writers who want to be bloggers as well as earn money online. It will have tips on writing blogs. If you want to check it out – here is the link: http://webearner.net
        You can make a comment on the blog and share it with anyone else who wants help.

        Liked by 1 person

      8. Hi Joycelin, i just finished reading some of your stories and the contents are very catching. i will check out the new blog you have going. I’m sure it will be of much help 🙂

        Like

  2. I love that you are trying to preserve your heritage and look forward to reading more of your posts. I have lost touch with much of my heritage and upon re-discovering it, I’ve been ever so keen to re-establish my connection with past family culture, language and values. It has been a fun learning process.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you very much Amanda. Welcome! I could not be more proud of my heritage and wish I could do more. I am so glad you are re-connecting with your heritage. It can give you a delightful satisfaction and a sense of belonging. I think as we grow and travel and live in many places, it is always important to anchor to certain heritage that you feel is yours. Not many may agree with me – but that is my opinion. I took a quick visit to your blog and will come again. I notice you are an artist also. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Hi Joycelin, I just wanted to stop by your blog and see what I can learn from you. Very nice job, I am glad that. What a great heritage you have. I love the story, and even though I am on the other side of the world, many of the best lessons I have learned in life were from my grandparents, and extended family members. I look forward to learning more from you. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Hi Joycelin, I just came across your Blog and love it, Being from Ireland, I have a huge respect for my ancestors and our heritage, which like many other ancient cultures has been watered down to near extinction. One of my main goals ids to raise awareness and educate people to our vast culture, heritage and mythology.

    Looking forward to following you Blog,

    All the best,

    Eddie

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you very much Eddie, lovely to meet you. We have a lot of work to do; protecting heritage. I followed your blog too because I love your pictures. My heritage on my father’s side is Australian (but Irish originally) so we could be wantoks.

      Like

      1. Thanks Joycelin, Sorry, just catching up on the Lingo, (wantoks) 🙂 We sure could be, apparently my family trace back to the first Milesian King of Ireland, about 1000 B.C. And on my mothers side back to Brian Boru one of the countries best known High Kings. You are right for sure, we got our work cut out for us. One thing I have noticedabout ancient cultures is that they all have unique similarities between them, not just in culture, but their lore especially, cant wait to learn more from you 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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Tribalmystic is storytelling about people, places, and things that have extraordinary stories. Author: Joycelin Leahy

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