The Fragrant Beauty – Photography


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The fragrant beauty of the frangipani always makes me homesick for Papua New Guinea. It also takes me across the ocean and the Pacific Islands. I am slowly building up my collection of frangipani in my garden in Brisbane and hope one day I could be surrounded by a variety of fragrances all year around. These are only three types out of the 12 different species I have.

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The name frangipani came from an Italian perfume made to scent gloves in the 16th Century; the maker was called Marquis Frangipani. The scientific name for these beauties is Plumeria (as known in America). The genus name, Plumeria, commemorates Charles Plumier, a seventeenth century French botanist. The flower is native to Central America, Venezuela and Mexico. And, it grows across the Pacific Islands, Asia and other tropical countries.

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22 thoughts on “The Fragrant Beauty – Photography”

  1. These are sooo beautiful!! Frangipani are one of my favourite flowers and you captured their beauty so wonderfully! Thank you so much for sharing 🙂 L.T. Garvin pointed your blog out to me and I´m so happy she did! You are an amazing and inspiring artist! I´m looking very much forward to all your future-posts! Have a lovely day and a great weekend! Sarah 🙂

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    1. Dear Sarah, what a lovely comment to receive at the end of a long week. Thank you so much. (Thank you L.T. Gavin also). I find frangipanis irresistible for their smell and beauty. I’m glad you like these ones. Culturally, they stir a lot of emotions and memories of festivals, dancing, death an many ceremonies I’ve been to. I’ve learnt art by experimenting, practicing, and making mistakes, and I’m glad you like some of the work here. I wish you a great weekend too. 🙂 I shall visit your blog now.

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      1. You´re most welcome!! 🙂
        Frangipanis grow here in Germany only in greenhouses, so I can only admire their beauty there or if I travel a bit south, to Spain for instance. That´s were I came across them for the first time during a holiday 🙂
        I´m really happy to have found your blog – your art is amazing! And learning it by experimenting and making occasional mistakes is natural and, at least in my opinion, the only way to do it right 😉
        Thank you so much for visiting and following my blog – it is much appreciated!! 🙂 xoxo

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    1. Hi Nomzi, I remembered something after reading your comment. My grandma and I made perfumed coconut oil by boiling dried cardamon flowers with some cinnamon bark in the coconut cream until it became honey colour, but clear. It was so beautiful. That was my perfume venture. 🙂

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      1. I can make it in Australia, easy. But the whole culture of breaking through the wild jungle and looking for the tree by their scents and getting beaten by insects while you are trying to separate dirt from dried cardamon flowers is missing…and I miss my grandma’s tuition and guide too and how we sat and chewed and told stories while the oil turned. It’s not the same being a sorcerer’s apprentice in a foreign land Nomzi. 🙂

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  2. To my nose the Frangipani down here is never as fragrant as PNG. On 28 Jan 2016 21:03, “Tribalmystic stories” wrote:

    > tribalmysticstories posted: ” The fragrant beauty of the frangipani always > makes me homesick for Papua New Guinea. It also takes me across the ocean > and the Pacific Islands. I am slowly building up my collection of > frangipani in my garden in Brisbane and hope one day I could be surr” >

    Liked by 2 people

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