Tag Archives: Art & Photography

Bird Jackpot – Picture Story


The crested pigeon (Ocyphaps lophotesis) is one of two species in Australia with a black spike on its head. This one is a remainder of two I had on my property. I believe the wild cat (abandoned house pet) has eaten one. In the picture also are lorikeets, honey eaters and magpies.

A hot day in Brisbane can be uncomfortable and irritating, but for me, it was an opportunity to see who was visiting the blue waterhole at Bellbowrie. When I got closer, two days ago, I hit a bird jackpot. Ten-twelve birds of four species had come to drink. Photos are ordinary because I had a short lens and had to go behind the tree. And when the birds had drunk and started to fly away, my feathered son caught me behind the tree so he lingered on to say hello.

Kaz and a honey eater or noisy minor as they are known. Noisy miners usually gang up and attack larger birds, but on the property they are quite sweet and tolerate all the other birds.
Katz the feathered son.

Soft Leaves – Photography


The Dead and the Living – JK. Leahy Photography

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JKLeahy Picture©

Soft Leaves are part of the Dead and the Living Photography I often do. I try to feature my own artistic view of the subtle colours and structures of leaves, plants and vegetation, insects and wildlife that surround me. Sometimes I like the beauty and art in their decaying form.

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JKLeahy Picture©

The soft leaves pictured here fell from succulent plants I grow in hanging pots. Lucky for me, they fell into an old rusted steel wheelbarrow. A couple of small seedlings were saved as well.

I really like how soft the colours and the leaves themselves were. And to have various orange and grey mirrored from a cold hard rusting steel as the backdrop was totally unexpected.

I hope you like these pictures too.

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JKLeahy Picture©

 

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JKLeahy Picture©

 

Paper Flowers – Photography


The Paper Flower – JK.Leahy

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I’m told they are Spiraea crenata. They are tiny. Under the lens, they look like paper flowers. But, they sure are real. These beautiful white blooms look almost like bleached paper. There are several scattered bunches on the bush at our door. Hopefully by spring, more of these miniature bouquets will cover the whole bush.

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One flower head is as large as the size of an adult finger nail.

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White Lines – Photography


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A lampshade made from spliced white wire fades. After months of open weather, sun and rain the lampshade now reveals its true colour of indigo before rust moves to invade its crispy white lines.

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Art and Science of 3D Scan by Photogrammetry


The Wiki defines Photogrammetry as the science of making measurements from photographs, especially for recovering the exact positions of surface points. And, it may be used to recover the motion pathways of designated reference points located on any moving object, on its components and in the immediately adjacent environment. If you don’t understand this definition then watch this vimeo made by an artist/photographer and hopefully it would explain the process better.

Photogrammetry is an exciting technology according to Kwai Bun, the photographer and creator of this cool stuff!

“I’m an adventurous and enthusiast photographer”, said Bun about his passion.

Bun said the photogrammetry process is especially suitable for high-end human scan due to the flexible scanning scale and speed of acquisition.

This video shows a small clip of Bun’s journey on this project. The founder and director of ManyMany Creations Ltd. & Quantum Matrix Ltd begins to assemble his own rig installation from scratch. The project showcases beautifully presented 3D scanning results for various talents with close-up head, full body and art poses juxtapositions. The video is also a great overview to anyone curious about how photogrammetry can be used in 3D scanning Human.

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Ice Cream Cones You Can Only See


My sister-in-law asked me once if I wanted to see ice cream cones.

“To eat?” I asked.

“No – just to see,” she said.

I thought that was a rather weird thing to suggest, until I actually saw what she meant.

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Shampoo Ginger Cones are referred to as ice cream cones in Lae, Papua New Guinea where many other beautiful ginger plants are found. This plant species originated from Hawaii.

When it flowers, these tiny orchid-like bloom protrudes from the cones. It is hard to imagine that a tough, robust and rubbery bulb could produce such a delicate flower.

The featured collection (here) came from photos I took of my sister-in-law Esther Kauc’s garden. Both Esther and my mother have cultivated a wide range of ginger plants for the unique flowers and dense leafy coverage which provides shade and boundary for their homes.

Upon seeing the plants, I realised what Esther had meant. I didn’t have any urge to bite into them – but I was captivated by the ginger’s beauty so much so, I could not stop looking at them.

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Perfect Landing – Grasshopper Photography


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This grasshopper made a perfect landing on our red bar chair when I was up-close and photographing a Kookaburra outside yesterday. Sounds like a David Attenborough moment, but only because, the grasshopper injured its second left joint. There is an ant on it if you check the third picture down.

I shall post the Kookaburra pictures tomorrow. I was pleased the red bar chair provided more than what I could hope for in a backdrop, especially providing a good contrast to the insect’s beautiful green colour. The grasshopper did take off as soon as the hungry bird made a move towards it.

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Change of Mood – Photography


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In a few hours, the mood changed. The storm changed the mood of the people on this beach very quickly.  First it was sunny, and then this dark haze and dense clouds moved in rapidly. Everyone started packing and leaving the waterfront.

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Most times, the beach in Kingscliff, New South Wales Australia is a glorious place to be. It is a stunning coastline with sugar-soft baby sand dunes. It does not get too crowded and it has gentle waterways the whole family can enjoy. I took these pictures when we were packing up to leave our spot on the beach, three weeks ago.

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Where the Seagulls Hunt – Poem and Photography


I took a trip with my friend Erue Bucher and her daughter, the gorgeous Livuana to Kingscliff towards New South Wales in the last few days. Sea, salt and wide open spaces always affects my perception. It also takes me back to my roots.

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Where the Seagulls Hunt    JK.Leahy©

Where the sand meets salt,

I will meet my child

Warm rivers reach for the cold

depths of unknown ocean floor;

I touch what is on hold

Down by the seashore,

scattered seagulls roam and hunt

Threading wet and dry powdery sand,

leaving behind a footprint lace,

meandering across wide open space;

mind races across history made

A slender pair of orange legs

tucked under a mop so neat,

plumed white and grey feathers

how much a heart holds so close

Beady eyes remain untethered,

scouting along the ocean shores,

where hungry beachgoers

share the harvest of the summer

Thoughts weaving beyond the shores

and everything flows where tide goes

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The Jacobean Lily – Photography and Gardening


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I found another exotic mysterious plant in my pond – yes, in the pond and we have been here four years. I realised that since the water has almost dried out this spring, it has given the Jacobean or Aztec lily a chance to grow and flower.

Searching on the internet and asking friends about the beautiful red flower, I found this website with the information – mystery solved. Below is what they said:

As there is no need to say much about this beautiful lily apart from the fact that we have found them extremely easy to grow. Jacobean lilies grow very well in full sun.
In Queensland, they tend to flower at all times of the year (in fact, there is very rarely a month without some flowering somewhere in the garden).
Jacobean lilies do less well under trees but do survive and multiply and lastly they prefer to be in soil that drains freely.
The Aztec lily is an absolute joy to have in the garden or in pots and are very companionable with other plants.

After the flowering, I have transferred the Jacobean lily to a nice dry sunny spot, hoping for more gorgeous flowers in the future.