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A beautiful insight with great images by blogger Marcelle Bucher from her recent trip with family to Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea.

Marcelle Bucher

Although brief, a few days in Moresby was a breath of fresh (debatable) air after a long three years of not visiting. Touchdown on the tarmac was followed by a lengthy but interesting tour of the miles and miles of new roads built around the city as well as a visit to Koki Fish Market. The multitude, quality and price of Koki is unbelievable. The market is built over the water so the fish is literally straight from the sea to the stalls.

In fact, the whole marketing scene in PNG is unreal. The produce is fresh, the price makes eating your vegetables or fruit incredibly feasible and attractive, and frankly… the people selling the produce are inspiring.

Labour is on a whole other level for market sellers despite the foolish appearance the job gives of sitting around all day. I thought the bag full of produce I was carrying…

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Welcome to Marcelle…


I am proud to share one of my love’s blog. I have introduced my niece Marcelle Bucher on tribalmystic.me blog so unless you are new, you know her. She only started blogging and I accidentally found her. Please welcome her into the blogging community.

Marcelle Bucher

Hello! I’m Marcelle.

I am half Swiss, half Papua New Guinean and have been brought up throughout the South Pacific islands and Australia. I live in the emerging city of Brisbane, Australia however need to escape its confines quite regularly.

I don’t have passions or goals, as yet… just simply living the way I’d like to.

This blog is the diary I’ve always wanted to keep, but never have. Except you should expect more photo than written posts as I don’t consider myself a writer! Welcome to Marcelle…

Posted from Sierre, Switzerland

Jan 31st, 2018

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Concerns For the World’s Largest Butterfly


Papua New Guinea (PNG) is home to the world’s largest butterfly – the “Ornithoptera alexandrae” or Queen Alexandra birdwing. Its wingspan can grow to 25cm. Queen Alexandra only breeds and lives in the Managalas Plateau in Eastern PNG or Oro Province. The butterfly numbers are unknown, and its habitat is increasingly disappearing. There are also concerns that the number of the large butterflies are depleting.

The Queen Alexandra’s Birdwing is on the red list of threatened species of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), and its international trade is banned. From the perspective of species conservationists, the butterfly satisfies all of the criteria to make it a critically endangered species. 

Walter Rothschild discovered the species in 1907 and named it after Alexandra of Denmark. The first European to discover the butterfly was one of Rothschild’s employee, Albert Stewart Meek during their expedition to Papua New Guinea.

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Female Queen Alexandra image from Manchester Museum collection.

Unusual Reproductive Biology

The threatened butterfly is vulnerable because of its unusual reproductive biology. The female lays its eggs exclusively on a poisonous vine called Aristolochia. Once the caterpillars have hatched, they ingest the plant’s toxic leaves, making them unpalatable for potential predators.

The Aristolochia winds its way up into the crowns of jungle trees, which can grow to heights of up to 40 meters (131 feet). The butterfly would be lost without the vine, so propagating the Aristolochia is one of the main goals of conservationists.

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Male Queen Alexandra image from Manchester Museum collection.

 

ANZAC Centenary


Today ABC reported: Thousands of people have attended Anzac Day dawn services at Gallipoli and Villers-Bretonneux to mark exactly 100 years since Australian and New Zealand troops came ashore. Here is more on the history of ANZAC from a fellow blogger.

Thank you for sharing this post, Pacificparatrooper

Pacific Paratrooper

James Charles Martin (1901-1915), youngest Australian KIA at Gallipoli James Charles Martin (1901-1915), youngest Australian KIA at Gallipoli

Anzac Centenary

Between 2014 and 2018 Australia and New Zealand will commemorate the Anzac Centenary, marking 100 years since their  involvement in the First World War.

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The Anzac Centenary is a milestone of special significance to all Australians and New Zealanders.  The First World War helped define them as a people and as nations.

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During the Anzac Centenary they will remember not only the original ANZACs who served at Gallipoli and the Western Front, but commemorate more than a century of service by Australian and New Zealand servicemen and women. [And I hope other nations will as well.]

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The Anzac Centenary Program encompasses all wars, conflicts and peacekeeping operations in which they have been involved.   And to honour all those who have worn the uniforms.  The programs involved with the Centenary urge all to reflect on their military…

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