Tag Archives: Flower Photography

Hibiscus, Dead and Living Photography


The Dead and the Living – J.K. Leahy Photography

The Hibiscus is one of my favourite tropical flowers. I enjoy looking at their delicate silky petals which open graciously at day time and close tightly at night. The flowers remind me of women and especially my mother, with a strong confident character, that others often easily bruise without being aware. And when she (my mother) has closed herself, she is closed.

In the Pacific Islands, we love wearing the hibiscus for its beauty and many assorted colours. It’s bark is used as cloth (similar to mulberry bark Tapa is made from), and the flowers of the hibiscus can be eaten. The flower is slightly acidic and is made into tangy sweet jelly. Rosella jam is made from a type of hibiscus. Here is a recipe I found on Food.com.

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I have two types of red hibiscus in my garden, one I have shown here before. Butterflies also love sleeping under the leaves. The same red hibiscus is positioned in the front of our house and after a recent dry spell that was softened by torrential rains – the one crazy weather after another bought and abundance of flowers. I ran down about 6pm two days ago and all the petals were closed. I forgot the flowers did that.

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Here are some pictures of the flower, photographed (yesterday) wherever they had fallen, except for the ones I arranged in the group. I also photographed the flowers on our driveway, where car tyres had run over the dead flowers. I felt like making some art with the fallen flowers, so I hope you like them. This week, I will also post pictures of my new star of Christmas.

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Wisteria: A Flower of Meaning and Beauty


Wisteria: A Flower of Meaning and Beauty

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Above is my first bloom from one of five wisteria flowers I have in my garden. I did not plant these vines from the pea family, a soil improving legume, but discovered them three springs ago. The plants must have preserved their roots despite harsh weather and no care – before we took on this property five years ago. Wisterias are delicate and beautiful tropical flowers. They are grown in USA and Asia, particularly China and Japan, and Australia. The wisteria flowers come in different colours and hang down like grapevines. The flowers have meanings associated with good luck and new beginnings; and often grown in pathways and entrances to bring these meanings to (hopefully) fruition.

I was going to list the meanings, but I found good information with some meanings on this beautiful blog: Flower Meaning.

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These green seeds above are not from wisteria flowers, but wild tobacco tree. This wisteria finds support by climbing on the wild tobacco. The flowers of the wild tobacco surprisingly almost copy the same colours of the wisteria.

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Above are wild tobacco flowers.

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Wisteria budding blossom.

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So, since this spring is bringing me full blooms of wisteria, I would like to share with all my readers the amount of good luck and happiness that I have in my garden. Thank you!