Kalem – Warrior Woman Tribal Designs


Dear blogging family,

I have been writing less and creating art more this year. I’d like to share with you some of my projects I have been working on, apart from my recent art exhibition at the Redland Performing Art Centre (September).

With the art I have been producing, I have launched a new fashion and accessories label called Kalem Warrior Woman. Kalem is my christian name, sometimes used as my middle name. The “warrior woman” part is another story, please read on.

Why fashion label you may ask? Well, back in PNG I had a clothing business called Kalem Kollection for over 20 years before we moved to Australia. I wanted to create something Papua New Guinean and also carry on my passion to promote and protect our cultural designs and cultural heritage. The creative turned into business and before I knew it, I was making corporate wear. When we left PNG, I was unable to pursue this work due to high costs of travel. Now we are, almost 15 years later.

You may remember my niece Marcelle Bucher who is our model for kale Warrior Woman.

My beautiful niece Marcelle Bucher has graciously modelled in this photoshoot with her aunty. I’m really grateful to her. She has made it so easy for me, and helped show Kalem very well. This is a selection of clothes and accessories that will go into the Pacific Fashion Festival tomorrow in Cloudlands, Brisbane from 1-4pm. Here is a brief history of my brand name Kalem and why our tag line is the Warrior Woman. This blurb was published by the Pacific Fashion Festival.

      

Pacific Fashion Festival is excited to announce the fierce label ‘Kalem – Warrior Woman’ by Joycelin Kauc Leahy from Papua New Guinea. The label has a deep sense of history and meaning that cannot be overlooked. In the early 1900’s Joycelin’s great-grandmother and her sister fought in court for their land after their father was chased out across the Huon from Salamaua during a tribal fight. In a man’s world, the daughters of their father were regarded as foreigners in their own land because their father was gone. The two sisters battled in court against local landowners, the missionary and colonial government and won! They won not only for themselves but for their people who were eventually settled on a patch called Ambesi.

Eventually, Joycelin’s mother inherited this battle by birth and had to also endure similar battles for her land rights as a woman over the land of which she overcame with victory. It was through her mothers and great grandmothers battles that Joycelin was given the opportunity of a good life, education and a loving upbringing because they were women that fostered her art and talent. She now dedicates her label to her fierce bloodline of women as “warrior women” in the literal sense. All artwork on Kalem textiles is influenced by cultural motifs from Papua New Guinea, created from what Joycelin paints and sometimes partnership work created with PNG artist and former Kalem designer, (Keia Daure). Joycelin is known for her use of watercolour and natural pigments she creates from plants. Joycelin believes in the deeper essence of preserving her culture, stories and history of her people with her art, fashion and designs.

                 

If you wish to purchase any of our dresses, you can do so on Paypal by contacting me:  joycelinleahy@gmail.com

I can email you a catalogue.

Our website: http://www.joycelinleahy.com will be launched before December with all the art, clothing and accessories.

                

                

18 thoughts on “Kalem – Warrior Woman Tribal Designs”

  1. yep……a warrior streak that continues in both art and life….what joyous colors both in the fabrics and in person……bravo and viva…..

    kah wah tan about.me/thecolorbox

    On Fri, Oct 27, 2017 at 10:18 PM, Tribalmystic stories wrote:

    > tribalmysticstories posted: “Dear blogging family, I have been writing > less and creating art more this year. I’d like to share with you some of my > projects I have been working on, apart from my recent art exhibition at the > Redland Performing Art Centre (September). With the art I h” >

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Chris, thank you very much. I guess it is similar where you paint it on. The orange on, I painted a string bag and then split the art into repeats and did them on digital print. The mask (blue) was just painted straight into repeats. If you understand textile “lingo”. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Oh My! Chris – you made me laugh so much, I cried. Maybe if you are interested in batik – then you should research other textiles, just saying. Hahahaha. BTW, you can also make fibre for hats and dresses from banana trunk..LOL

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s